Sunday, July 19, 2015

Guidelines for Church Membership


“Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God, serve one another” (1 Peter 4:10)

Seen in the newsletter of First United Methodist Church Franklin, NC…

"From time to time, we need to be reminded of the fact that we joined the church...

...NOT to receive special attention, but to render special service;

...NOT to get our name on the roll, but to get God’s kingdom into our hearts;

...NOT to promote our private secular business, but to become a partner in God’s business;

...NOT to be petted and nursed as a baby, but to grow in Christian maturity;

...NOT to improve our own earthly reputation, but to strengthen our Christian character;

...NOT to be served, but to serve;

...NOT to be praised by others, but to direct others to the praise of God alone;

...NOT to save our own souls alone, but to help save others;

...NOT to do as we would please, but to be found pleasing God;

...NOT to make our own rules, but to live by God’s rules;

...NOT to appear respectable to others, but to become respectable to God;

...NOT to find a group of perfect people, but to worship a perfect God;

...NOT to show how good we are, but to learn how good we can become;

...NOT because God’s church might fail without us, but because we might fail without God’s church.”

If everyone at LaGrange First U.M.C. practiced being the kind of church member described above, what kind of church would we have? Better still, if everyone practiced their membership in the above ways in our community, how would our community be different?

My prayer is that each and every one of us will continue to find wasys to be the “hands and feet of Jesus” in our world, and that we'll have the grace and courage to be faithful in whatever it is that God wants us to do. Always remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Pastor's Top Ten List

“Be doers of the word, and not merely hearers who deceive themselves.” (James 1:22)

Being new to a church, I am often asked, "Pastor, how can we help you the most?"  While the following thoughts and sentiments are not original with me, here is a list of "Top Ten" things we pastors (myself included) most love to hear from church members...

10.       Hey, it’s MY turn to sit in the front pew!

9.         I was so caught up in the sermon, I never 
            noticed that the service went 10 minutes 
            over!

8.         Personally, I find sharing my faith with others more enjoyable than golf.

7.         Pastor, I’ve decided to give our church the $200 a month I was spending on the 
            lottery.

6.         I want to volunteer to be the permanent Sunday School teacher for the Middle 
           School class.

5.         In addition to what we give to our Conference Apportionments in our church budget, let’s give more than that to missions!

4.         Pastor, I just love it when we sing songs and hymns that we’ve never sung before!

3.         I was thinking “somebody ought to do something about that,” and then I thought
            “I’m going to do something about it!”

2.         Pastor, we’d like to send you to that Bible conference at the Walt Disney World.

1.         Pastor, would you help me discover some ministry that God could use me in?

[-Modified from a 1996 newsletter article by Rev. Don Underwood from 
  Bowdon First UMC, Bowdon, GA]

My prayer is that we would be a church filled with people who seek God and seek to find a place where they can serve Him!  Remember that God loves you and I do, too!

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

"A More Excellent Way" -- A Christian Response to the June 26 Supreme Court Ruling

Strive for the greater gifts.  And I will show you a still more excellent way…
(1 Corinthians 12:31)

First, I share my apology to those of you who have been waiting patiently (or perhaps not so patiently) for your new Pastor to share his thoughts (as promised during worship this past Sunday) on the June 26th Supreme Court ruling that all states must allow same-sex marriages.  If you’ve ever moved to a new town and had to start from scratch getting to know new people in a new job, then you understand that the demands on one’s time from the new environment are sometimes greater than anticipated or planned.  Nevertheless, here at long last is my promised response.

I should begin by stating that those who know me well know that I am not easily swayed or impressed by passionate politics or theology, one way or another.  So, if you are reading this blog looking for either a scathing diatribe against the Supreme Court’s decision, or excited support for it, I’m afraid you will be disappointed.  Instead, like what I think you’ll find with most United Methodist congregations (including our own), I find my own thoughts mixed.

On the one hand, the ruling affirms what I hope and pray we all know and understand to be biblically true:  that all persons – gay, lesbian, bisexual, straight, black, white, red, yellow, mixed, male, female, transgendered, Democrat, Republican, Independent, conservative, progressive, rich, poor, middle class -- are of sacred worth, and deserve to be treated with respect and justice, especially under the law of our land.  In like manner, the ministry and teachings of Jesus himself affirm that his Church (of which LaGrange 1st UMC is a part) should be a place where all God’s children are welcome.  Jesus did not place limits on whom he welcomed, and neither should we. On the contrary, Jesus intentionally welcomed those who society often shunned and shut out, and consequently, our doors should likewise be open to any and all who seek God through our ministries, regardless of their race, gender, status, sexual orientation, or marriage preference.  Baptism, Communion, funerals, and Confirmation continue to be  open and available to all people.

On the other hand, even though the ruling affirms what two-thirds of Americans now believe about same-sex relationships, it should be noted that Christians do not determine our morals or ethics either by public opinion polls or by court decisions.  The Supreme Court, after all, is charged with interpreting the U.S. Constitution, not the Bible.  The Court is not asked to discern God’s will, or what constitutes moral or ethical behavior for Christians (nor does this ruling profess to do that).  As a practical matter, then, this ruling does not affect current church teachings or practice at all:  all churches and clergy still maintain their First Amendment right to participate in or perform a marriage only if they elect to do so, and clergy in any tradition still have the legal right to decline performing a wedding for whatever reason, as they do now.  The ruling likewise does not change the official stance of the United Methodist Church on these subjects – only our United Methodist General Conference (meeting next May 2016) has the power to do that.  As such, even though same-sex marriages are now legal, UM clergy at present cannot perform them, nor do we ordain “self-avowed, practicing homosexuals.”  Though there are many who wish to change these policies in the future, at present they are still church law.

Still, if anything, this ruling has again revealed how divided we are as a United Methodist church and as God’s people over questions such as these.  Deeply committed Christians hold firmly and passionately to both sides of this debate, and demonstrate how it is possible for faithful Christians to interpret scripture differently on these issues.  Within our own congregation, there are those who have strong opinions about one view or its opposite.

So, yes, there are many dimensions about these subjects on which we can disagree.  That is inevitable:  any time one opens up a controversial topic to a roomful of people, you’ll have a roomful of opinions.  Yet, I can’t help but wonder if there is not a better way to address these issues than merely arrogantly asserting our own opinions and the “correctness” of our own positions (quoting from the Bible, of course!), as we are so fond of doing.  I can’t help but wonder if there is a “more excellent way” (as Paul puts it in the scripture above) than fighting and posturing over issues that (while important), may not lie at the heart of Christianity.

Two quotes from John Wesley, the founder of Methodist Christianity, may be helpful here: “As to all opinions which do not strike at the root of Christianity, we think and let think” (from Wesley’s tract “The Character of a Methodist”); and “Although a difference in opinions… may prevent an entire external union, yet need it prevent our union in affection? Though we cannot think alike, may we not love alike? May we not be of one heart, though we are not of one opinion? Without all doubt, we may. Herein all the children of God may unite, notwithstanding these smaller differences. These remaining as they are, they may forward one another in love and in good works” (from Wesley’s sermon “Catholic Spirit”). Wesley’s point (and Paul’s in his description of love as the “more excellent” way) is that rather than focusing on the things that divide us (the minority of things over which we disagree), as Christians should we not focus on the majority of things which unite us, and “agree to disagree” (or as Wesley said, “think and let think”) about the rest?  In times of controversy, should we not focus on what binds us together, rather than what keeps us apart?

With that in mind, I want to wrap up my own words about this issue with the words from another UM clergy colleague (Rev. Jeremy Troxler of Spruce Pine UMC) whose response to this ruling I found especially helpful – words that I cannot improve upon but feel compelled to repeat here:

“The Bible says that the church is like a family, where we are brothers and sisters with each other.  If your family is like mine, then there are a lot of important things that you and your family members disagree about or even fight about.  But at the end of the day you are still a family; you are still held together by something deeper than whether or not you agree.  You are held together by the fact that you have been made part of one another, and you are held together by stubborn, durable, steady love.

The church is a family like that.  We are a family that can disagree about important things, but at the end of the day we are held together by something deeper than the fact we agree about everything, or even about every important thing:  we are held together by the fact that God’s grace has rescued us and is remaking us and has made us a part of one another. We are held together by love, the love of Christ.

That love does not banish disagreement, but it does join us in a oneness deeper than all difference, a fidelity more enduring than our fights, a reconciliation that outlasts our wrongs.

Perhaps we even need some level of disagreement for this love to grow among us…. Perhaps God has God’s own purposes in putting us very different people, with our dueling Facebook posts and our rival news sources, all together next to each other in the pew.  Perhaps one of those purposes is to learn the meaning of love.  Perhaps it is only by learning to love people we disagree with, only by learning to love people who we know are wrong, only by learning to love sinners that we learn what love, Christ-like love, even, yes, married love, really is.

In 1 Corinthians 12, we find the Apostle Paul writing to a divided church about how we are all part of the body of Christ, a body where the eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you,” nor can the head say to the feet, “I have no need of you.”  We are a body, where, paraphrasing what the Bible says about marriage, the many become one flesh. Here’s what I think that means:  [And I (Pastor Brian) would affirm these words to those of you reading my blog, as well…]

● If you celebrated on Friday [when the Supreme Court ruling was announced], you belong here and are needed here [at our church].
● If you were upset on Friday, you belong here and are needed here.
● If you didn’t know how to feel on Friday, you belong here and are needed here.
● If you think what I have said here is too wishy-washy, and you wish your preacher took a stronger stand with your side today, you belong here and are needed here.

The only way you might not belong here is if you believe the body of Christ should be a place where everybody agrees with you 100%, and where what you hear from the pulpit every week should just confirm whatever you came here already believing; basically if you think the body should be made up of one part:  your brain. I would say that if that’s what you want, the only way to get it is if you keep your own company….  Perhaps if you searched hard enough you might finally be able to find another group of believers who agree with each other on things like this 100% – but if you do, whatever it is, it won’t be the church of Jesus Christ.

So I guess we’ll just have to accept God’s own mysterious purposes and continue struggling to seek God’s bigger-than-we-thought will with each other. I guess we’ll have to weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice, even all at the same time, even if it means we try to force a smile through our tears because at least our friends are happy, of if it means we celebrate but with a catch in our throat because we can’t totally forget those who find it hard to rejoice with us because of conscience.
I guess we’ll have to stay together and try to respect and love each other and fail and ask forgiveness and forgive and then try again.” [See citation below]

Amen, Pastor Troxler!  The way of love IS God’s more excellent way.  It’s not easy, and it’s not what the rest of the world would do, but it’s what we’re called to do and be as God’s people.  I look forward to seeking ways we can do this together as your new Pastor!  Always remember that God loves you and I do, too!


[NOTE:  For more reading about this subject, including sources from which my thoughts have been shaped and formed, I invite you to read the articles in the following links:







Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Faith-Bits Welcomes LaGrange 1st UMC

“I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, so that you may now that you have eternal life.” (1 John 5:13)

I’d like to extend a warm welcome to members of my new congregation (LaGrange 1st UMC in LaGrange, GA) to  “Faith Bits,” my blog about life and faith in the 21st-century.  Although I use this this forum primarily to host my Pastor’s articles for our church’s newsletter, you’ll also find here some of my personal thoughts and musings on life, faith and Christian living relating not only to our local church, but also to our local, state, national and world community at large. 

Over the course of time, within this forum you’ll find words and stories of inspiration, information, challenge and humor.  I encourage you to subscribe at right (i.e.,"Follow My Blog By Email") to receive all posts as they appear, remembering that I will sometimes post articles here that will not appear in our bi-monthly church newsletter.  And, as I designed this to be an interactive online forum (where my articles are merely discussion-starters), please feel free to share appropriate comments as you feel led (click on the “comment” link at the bottom of each post), and/or share them with a friend via email or social media.

Finally, on this blog you’ll also find “Links to Life” websites that can help resource you in your walk of faith, as well as resource links to a few of my sermons (and other materials) that address common questions of faith and spirituality that I’m often asked or that I hear.

In the same way and spirit as the apostle Paul writing letters to his congregations (letters that we today call “Epistles” in the Bible’s New Testament), my hope and prayer is that this blog -- “Faith Bits” -- will become a connection point not only for life within our faith community at LaGrange First UMC, but will also provide each of you with an important and trusted source (and resource) for your own personal walk with God.


Remember that God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Prayer for Charleston Violence

This is the prayer that I used today during worship as we prayed for our sisters and brothers in Charleston following the tragic shootings there last Wednesday...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Oh Lord, violence has broken out again in our land,
Striking down clergy and laity of your church
In a city just across our state line, in a church
Which is part of our fellow Wesleyan-Methodist family,
In a house of worship called Emanuel (God with us).

We cannot imagine the grief being felt by those family members
Who knew that their loved one went to church to pray and did not return home.
We pray for all who are managing the aftermath
in hospitals, counseling sessions, homes, huddles of friends,
and in our congregations, where we face the brutal realization
that even our “sanctuaries” are no longer considered sacred or safe.

We are shocked, pained, astounded, angry at the injuries one person has caused,
And at the injury and hurt of his own soul that could allow him to act so brutally toward others of your children. We pray for him, O Lord, that he would find your peace and healing from the anger and prejudice of his heart.

But we also pray for ourselves today, for what happened last Wednesday in Charleston is still happening all over our world and to us all the time.  For if we have even spoken ill of another person because of the color of their skin, the content of their politics, the character of their religion, the nature of their sexual orientation, or any other reason then we have wounded them.  Forgive us, and give us courage and grace to confess our sin and apologize for our un-Christ-like actions and behavior.   For we know that the words once spoken by your servant Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. are true which say that “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

So,  Lord, break into our world with the power of your Holy Spirit.  Help us. Save us. Redeem us. Restore us. And help us be your instruments of love right here. 

Empower us to be your church -- a church of love that overcomes hate.  A church of peace that overcomes violence.  A church of forgiveness that overcomes fear.  A church who’s love and grace shocks the world and leads them to a better way.  
Work in us. And through us. May it be so.

Lord, we pray this, not knowing all the answers, and beyond seeking answers, but simply seeking you.  Jesus, as the waters of life and of our world roll and threaten to overwhelm us, let us fly to you, the healer of our souls and the only hope for our world.
We pray this to the honor and glory of your holy name -- the name above all names, and the name of ultimate peace and healing -- and the one who taught us to pray, saying [THE LORD’S PRAYER]…"

          [--Prayer by Rev. Dr. Brian Germano, compiled from a variety of sources, including a prayer by Bishop
              Michael Watson, NGA Annual Conference (6/18/15), a prayer (“Prayer Following Recent School 
             Violence”) by Taylor Burton-Edwards at www.umcdiscipleship.org, & a quote by Martin Luther King, Jr.]

Friends

Friends come and friends go, but a true friend sticks by you like family” (Proverbs 18:24, The Message)

Packing up the dreams God planted
In the fertile soil of you
Can't believe the hopes he's granted
Means a chapter in your life is through
But we'll keep you close as always
It won't even seem you've gone
Cause our hearts in big and small ways
Will keep the love that keeps us strong

[Chorus:]
And friends are friends forever
If the Lord's the Lord of them
And a friend will not say "Never"
Cause the welcome will not end
Though it's hard to let you go
In the Father's hands we know
That a lifetime's not too long
To live as friends

With the faith and love God's given
Springing from the hope we know
We will pray the joy you'll live in
Is the strength that now you show
But we'll keep you close as always
It won't even seem you've gone
Cause our hearts in big and small ways
Will keep the love that keeps us strong”
[Chorus:Repeat x2]

[--"Friends" by Michael W. Smith, album The Michael W. Smith Project (1983), re-released in album Change Your World (1992)]

As we move to a new church, please know that we thank God for our ten years among and with you, our friends in Christ, and that we pray for you God’s richest blessings in the future! And never forget that God loves you and we do, too!  Brian & Trish

Sunday, June 14, 2015

2015 North Georgia Annual Conference

“And let us consider how to provoke one another to love and good deeds, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another.” (Hebrews 10:24-25)

This coming week (June 15-19), over 2800 delegates representing the 1000 churches and 370,000+ United Methodists in North Georgia will be gathering at the Classic Center in Athens, Georgia for the North Georgia Annual Conference with the theme “We Are God’s People Connected: A Focus On Global Health.” This year I am serving as our church’s clergy representative, and Pat Holcomb will serve as our laity delegate. In addition, Lee Bierce, Cindy Campbell and Frieda Brown will be present and serve as at-large delegates from our Atlanta-Marietta District.

Each year’s Annual Conference makes important decisions that affect every United Methodist church in our geographic area: approval and ordination of new clergy and retirement of older ones; appointments of pastors to local churches are finalized (as most of you already know, effective June 25th I will be appointed as the new Senior Pastor of LaGrange First UMC in LaGrange, GA, and Rev. Nanci Hicks will be appointed as the new Senior Pastor here at East Cobb UMC); adoption of the conference budget; support for and reports from conference missions and ministries; exciting worship and bible study opportunities to enrich our spiritual lives; present our “Bishop’s Offering” (“Imagine No Malaria” to end malaria on the African subcontinent); and much more! This year, Annual Conference will also be electing 11 clergy and 11 laity delegates to represent North Georgia Methodism at the 2016 General Conference of world-wide United Methodism -- the body that meets every four years to make official decisions that affect the entire denomination. 

Upon our return from Athens, your delegates will be available to report on important decisions that were made, and how these might affect us as a congregation.  In the meantime, you can find more information about Annual Conference (including videos and other resources) by CLICKING HERE.

Thank you for your prayers, both for ourselves as your representatives, and for the Conference itself.  Always remember, God loves you and I do too!

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Welcoming A (Female) Senior Pastor

“I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a minister of the church at Cenchreae, so that you may welcome her in the Lord as is fitting for the saints, and help her in whatever she may require from you.” (Romans 16:1-2)

If you were at worship on June 7th, you’ll know that during my message I shared some of the biblical and historical background for why we have women as Pastors and senior church leaders in our United Methodist Christian tradition. While most of you don’t have any issue with this practice, for those who still have questions I encourage you to read my sermon online HERE.

For the rest, I want to share selections from a recent “Leading Ideas: To the Point” newsletter by Dr. Lovett Weems, where he shares advice gathered from clergywomen graduates of the Lewis Fellows leadership development program about how to properly welcome a female Pastor:

“Celebrate your new pastor. Know that your new pastor continues a tradition of women in ministry going back to biblical times. Do all that you typically do to welcome a male pastor, including praying for her daily. Give her a generous opportunity to fulfill her ministry, and let any judgment be by the biblical standard of fruitfulness.

Treat her as your pastor first. Avoid putting gender first in conversations about her. Talk about her as you would a new male pastor. Use the proper title, or ask what she would like to be called. Avoid using terms of affection, and resist language such as “woman pastor” or “lady pastor.”

She will bring unique gifts for ministry. Learn your pastor's gifts rather than making gender assumptions. She has both strengths and limitations, just as your male pastors had. Most of your delights and objections will not be gender-based. Respect different types of leadership. Some male pastors are not very good. The same goes for women. If she isn’t serving your church well, it is not because she’s a woman.

Expect some resistance but avoid making very much of it. Expect some push back, especially if this is a new experience for your church. A few may leave, but far more are likely to join. Resist assuming the worst and making too much of it. Clergywomen are common in today’s world. Avoid allowing negative voices to dominate. Ask people to keep an open mind. Most resistance is based on the unknown.

Avoid stereotyping and assumptions. Keep pastoral expectations as before. Don’t assume she will be good with children but not finance. Don’t expect her to bring treats for meetings. Women often have family responsibilities but so do many men. Resist asking about her personal life, relation-ships, or family plans that you would not ask a male pastor.

Some things may not fit. Be open to repainting the office and replacing the pastor’s chair if it no longer fits the occupant. The pulpit may need adjustment for height, and make sure the sound system works for a female voice, especially if it’s high or soft.

Make sure there is a trusted feedback group. Your
new pastor needs regular honest feedback from those committed to her success. Assure that someone is asking your new pastor how things are going and listen. A trusted group that listens makes the pastor more open to receiving feedback she needs to improve.

Avoid references to appearance. Avoid making comments about her size, shape, or appearance. How she dresses or does her hair should not be a topic of conversation. Avoid such comments that would never be made to a male pastor.

Pay attention to boundary issues. Take seriously any concerns a female pastor expresses about sexual harassment or unwanted actions involving staff, parishioners, or others. All clergywomen encounter such situations at some point. Train church leadership in how to recognize when harassment or sexism is at play. Members need reminding that “If you didn’t say it to a male pastor, don't say it to a female pastor. If you didn’t kiss your male pastor, don’t do it now.”

The all purpose question to remember: “Would you honestly ask (say, criticize) this if the pastor were a man? If so, okay. If not, drop it."


I pray that you will remember these words of advice as you welcome Pastor Nanci in a few short weeks to be your new Senior Pastor.  Remember, God loves you and so do I!

Sunday, May 31, 2015

Patience, Patience

“Let patience have its perfect work, that you may be... complete, lacking nothing” (James 1:4)

We live in the world of instant cash, the ten-minute oil changes, one-hour photo processing, same day dry cleaning, and 30-second fast food.  As a result, waiting has grown today to become one of life's most trying experiences.  If things don't happen right now, a turbulence of impatience blows through our inner world -- I know, because like many of you, I sometimes have a trouble dealing with this.  And impatience can be thought of as “waiting in a hurry”!

As Christians, we sometimes direct our impatience toward God -- especially when undergoing a trial.  If God ca n create things out of nothing, then why doesn't He act NOW!?  He seems to always take His own good time! Yet, we know that God's timing is always right.  He is never in a hurry, but He’s also never late.  There is a "right time" for us, just as God waited until "the fullness of time" to send Jesus (Galatians 4:4).

A student asked a college professor once, “Can I take a shorter course of studies than the one prescribed?”  “Oh, yes,” replied the president, “but it all depends on what you want to be.  When God wants to make a giant oak, He takes many years.  But when He wants to make a squash, He takes a few months.”  The moral: we need patience to become what God intends for us to be.

What is it that God is calling you to do or be that requires patience?  Whatever it is, if you’ll trust in Him, He’ll guide you to persist and persevere, so hang in there and ask for strength to be patient!  Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Pentecost

"When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place....[And] all of them were filled with the Holy Spirit...” (Acts 2:1 & 4)

What do you think of when you hear the word APentecost@?  For some, it conjures up negative images of emotionalism, obstinacy, and religious fanaticism.  For others, it evokes the positive images of God's constant presence, power, and peace in our lives today.  And for still others, APentecost@ has no real impact or meaning at all B some of us know a lot about God as Father and about Jesus as his Son, but are a bit confused as to how Pentecost and the Holy Spirit fit into our faith.

But no matter what stereotypes you might have, we all need to be aware that without Pentecost and the Holy Spirit, there would be no Christian Church today.  Consequently, there would be no Christians, either, for the Holy Spirit is that manifestation of God who brings us to salvation, enables us to respond to God's grace given through Jesus, and gives us the power and ability to grow in that grace for the rest of our lives.  Without the Holy Spirit, we cannot even begin to live a Christian life.  The day called APentecost,@ then, is the holiday that we Christians celebrate as a reminder of this need.

You see, contrary to what some people or churches may think or imply, the Holy Spirit is not the sole possession of select Asuper-spiritual@ Christians, or of certain denominations or churches, but belongs to ALL who profess Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior.  If we are a Christian, the Spirit already lives within us.  The question that each of us needs to answer, then, is NOT ADo we have the Holy Spirit?@ but rather ADoes the Holy Spirit have US?@  Who is in the pilot seat of YOUR life:  You? or God?  This Pentecost (Sunday, May 24), my prayer is that you will open yourself to God=s Spirit as the pilot of your life.  Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Your New Pastor

"I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?" (Isaiah 43:19)

If you attended worship this past Sunday, you'll know that along with sharing our “REACH” commitments, we also shared the name of my successor.  If you weren’t there, allow me to catch you up:  I am both pleased and excited to announce that the new Senior Pastor of East Cobb UMC will be Rev. Nanci Hicks.  Her first Sunday with you in worship will be June 28th.

Nanci will be coming to you from Briarcliff UMC in northeast Atlanta, where she has served as Senior Pastor for the past two years.  Before that, she served as interim Pastor of Sacred Tapestry UMC here in Marietta (on Johnson Ferry Rd.), as Senior Pastor of Mossy Creek UMC in Cleveland, GA (where her church, like East Cobb UMC, was connected to a Camp Meeting ministry), as Director at an area Christian Retreat Center, and as Associate Pastor of Roswell UMC.   She and husband Steve have grown children.

Over the next month, she and I will be working closely together to ensure a smooth leadership transition.  However, since Nanci will not only be the first female Senior Pastor in our church’s history (although we’ve had multiple female Associate Pastors), and since the process of changing pastors may be new to many of you, part of that transition will include me sharing sermons and newsletter articles over the next month to remind us all of the biblical and practical reasons both for women as clergy leaders, and for our United Methodist “itinerant” system (the system whereby we rotate pastors).

For those who’ve not yet experienced either having a female Senior Pastor or any kind of pastoral change, I invite and encourage you to please give both a try before making hasty judgments or decisions.  Both can (and I believe will be) great blessings if you’re willing to stretch (to REACH) beyond what you’ve been comfortable with before in order to experience the “new thing” God has in store for you through your new leader.  Even though it may be challenging, don’t miss the opportunity to grow and mature as a believer through this transition!

In the meantime, the work of God’s church here at East Cobb UMC goes on without missing a beat!  Yes, be in prayer both for Nanci and myself as we prepare for this transition, and be in prayer for yourselves that you would be open to what God would do through it.  But at the same time, continue the great work of God’s church here at East Cobb UMC:  pray; worship; serve; study God’s word; give your tithes to the ongoing church ministry fund; and (if you haven’t already) make a three-year financial commitment of your “offerings” (that which is over-and-above your tithe) to our “REACH” capital journey so that East Cobb can fulfill its vision from God(My wife and I have already made ours -- won’t you do so, as well?)  [Click HERE for a digital REACH commitment card if you’ve yet to turn one in]


Always remember that God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, May 10, 2015

REACH and A Pastoral Move

I planted, Apollos watered, but God made it grow.” (1 Corinthians 3:6)

Some members have asked me (or wondered privately), “Brian, how will the news of your upcoming reappointment to a new church affect our REACH capital campaign?”  Well, the simple answer is:  It shouldn't one bit! (and I pray that you will not let it do so!)

Our REACH capital journey has never been about an individual person or their vision (mine, my successor’s, or anyone else’s), but about the vision that God has given to His people at East Cobb UMC to reach more of our community and world for Jesus Christ, using a new building as one tool to do that.

There are plenty of examples in scripture where this was the case.  For example, while Moses saw the “promised land” from a distance, it was his successor Joshua that actually lead the people of Israel to enter it. Later, while God gave King David the initial vision for the great Temple in Jerusalem, it was his son King Solomon who actually got to build and complete it.

And even in the scripture above (from 1 Corinthians 3), the apostle Paul highlights the biblical process of successor leadership when he says (listen to the entire passage in Verses 6-9): “I planted, Apollos watered, but God made it grow.  Because of this, neither the one who plants nor the one who waters is anything, but the only one who is anything is God who makes it grow. The one who plants and the one who waters work together, but each one will receive their own reward for their own labor. We are God's coworkers, and you are God's field, God's building.”

In case you didn’t know, Paul (like all United Methodist pastors) didn’t stay in one place too long.  Instead, he would preach and teach and lead in one place for a period of time, then move on to another place with someone else following him to pick up where he left off (in this case, a man named Apollos).  But his point is that neither the one who “plants” nor the one who “waters” is “anything” -- the only one that truly matters is “God who makes it grow.”  The “vision,” therefore, was never really about Paul or Apollos, but about God’s vision and work among them all.

So it is with our REACH journey: REACH is not about me or my successor, but about God’s call to His people at East Cobb UMC to reach more of its community for Jesus Christ. True, I may have I may have led us to better understand and clarify that vision, and my successor will help you to actually execute and carry it out, but the only one who truly matters in the whole process is “God who makes it grow.”

I trust that you will take this into consideration as you prayerfully discern the commitment(s) that God is calling each of us to share next week (May 17) on REACH Commitment Sunday.  I invite (and challenge) you to make your commitment not about me or my successor, but about the vision that God has for East Cobb UMC, and the exciting things that will take place when you as a church fulfill that vision!


Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Thoughts On "Being Sent"...

"The apostles and the elders... agreed to send some delegates chosen from among themselves to Antioch, together with Paul and Barnabas." (Acts 15:22)

If you were at worship today you'll know that it was announced by our District Superintendent that after serving 10 years as our church's Senior Pastor, I will be reappointed ("sent") by our Bishop to serve a another church beginning June 26th.

While this news at first came as a surprise to my family and I, upon subsequent prayer and reflection we have come to see God's hand in it in the some remarkable ways. Not only are we excited about the possibilities  for ministry in the place to which we (like Paul and Barnabas) are being sent, but I'm confident that the person God is sending to follow me as Senior Pastor here at East Cobb UMC is His choice to lead you in into the next phase of growth.

Most of you know that the process of moving (or "reappointing") pastors every so often (called the "Itinerancy") is one of the unique qualities of being a United Methodist congregation.  Based on the early church model of "sending/appointing" leaders, while it's often difficult for everyone when there is a pastoral transition, it does mean that churches don't need to have "search committees" or hire interim pastors, and pastors don't have to go "sell" themselves on the "open market" in order to find a new church. Instead, "no church is ever without a pastor," and "no pastor is ever without a church."

What's more is that since no single pastor possesses all the leadership qualities necessary to lead an individual church, over the course of several pastoral tenures (over, say, 20-30 years), a congregation led by several pastors will be more well-balanced than one who's had only one or two in that time, since each pastor will bring to them differing leadership skills:  some pastors are better speakers; some better organizers; some more people-oriented; and some better with evangelism or missions; etc.  While all of these are important, each pastor brings differing strengths to a congregation at differing times in its history.

Most importantly, when our Itinerant system works properly, it encourages congregations to be built around the people, rather than around a particular pastor.  In doing so, it lessens the likelihood that church members turn the pastor into an idol by becoming merely a "cult following" of that pastor.  So as you can see, while our system is challenging when there are transitions, there are plenty of good reasons to have it.

You may know that in order to protect the relationships of persons in the other congregations involved, we will not be sharing where I'll be moving or the identity of who is being appointed here until May 17.   After then, I'll be sharing a variety of sermons geared to help ease the transition.  In the meantime, however, I hope you'll join me in praying not only for me and my family as we prepare to leave, but for our entire congregation as we make our REACH journey commitments also on May 17 (I'll be making one, as well!), and for your new pastor as they prepare to arrive and begin leading  you in late June.

Always remember that God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Healthy Family

“This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” (John 15:12)

What constitutes a healthy family?  According to one family specialist, a healthy family is...      
1. Caring. Do you build bridges 
    instead of walls?
2. Respectful. Are people free to express their own opinions?
3. Convictional.  Is your family committed to a central value system?
4. Flexible. Are you willing to change the rules?
5. Expressive. Do you respond warmly to those in your family?
6. Responsible. Does each family member have some responsibility?
7. Initiating. Is your family involved in outside activities, 
    both apart and as a family?
8. Realistic. Do you see your family as others do?

[-- Howard Hendricks, Better Families BulletinMarch 1994, Volume 18:3

The characteristics above described a healthy biological family.  But these same qualities and characteristics can be applied to a spiritual family (a “church”), as well! How well do you think we here at East Cobb UMC do?  Are we caring, respectful, committed to a “central value system” (i.e., our Mission, Vision, and Values)?  Are we flexible, expressive, and responsible?  Do we initiate ministry outside ourselves, and are we realistic about the way others view us?


As we continue our “REACH” journey, I invite you to join me in giving thanks that we have a healthy spiritual family here at East Cobb UMC -- not a “perfect” one (no church is), but definitely a “healthy” one!  And just as each of us have found East Cobb UMC to be “family,” I invite us to support the work of “REACH” so that new persons today and long into the future will find a “family” home here, as well! Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, April 19, 2015

The Things That Haven't Been Done Before

“Do not remember the former things, or consider the things of old. I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?” (Colossians 3:17)


“The things that haven’t been done before,
those are the things to try.
Columbus dreamed of an unknown shore
at the rim of the far-flung sky,
And his heart was bold and his faith was strong
As he ventured in dangers new,
And he paid no heed to the jeering throng
Or the fears of the doubting crew.

The many will follow the beaten track
With guideposts on the way,
They live and have lived for ages back
With a chart for every day.
Someone has told them it’s safe to go
On the road he has traveled o’er.
And all that they ever strive to know
Are the things that were known before.

A few strike out, without map or chart,
Where never a [person] has been,
From the beaten paths they draw apart
To see what no [one] has seen.
There are deeds they hunger alone to do;
Though battered and bruised and sore,
They blaze the path for the many, who
Do nothing not done before.

The things that haven’t been done before,
Are the tasks worth while today;
Are you one of the flock that follows, or
Are you the one that shall lead the way?
Are you one of the timid souls that quail
At the jeers of a doubting crew,
Or dare you, whether you win or fail, Strike out for a goal that’s new?

[-- Edgar A. Guest (1881-1959)]

Today our church officially embarks on a new journey called "REACH", a 36-month endeavor that will give us the spiritual and financial tools to fulfill the vision we believe God has given us of "reaching" our community and world for Jesus Christ.  Not only do we serve one who constantly calls us forward, but who has also been there ahead of us and walks with us every step of the way. Our REACH journey will be a challenging one, but as God’s people, we're not be afraid to step out and do the things (like REACH) that God is calling us to do that have never been done before! Remember that God loves you and I do, too!

(To find out more information about our 
REACH journey, CLICK HERE)

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Not Quite Dead...


“When the disciples saw the Lord, they were filled with joy. Jesus said to them, ‘Peace be with you.  As the Father sent me, so I am sending you.’” (John 20:20b-21)

Ok, I confess. I’m impressed…  To the dismay of all (including myself), during the off-season the Atlanta Braves traded away most all of their big name players.  And by all accounts from baseball “experts,” in return they got, well… a mixture of “has beens” and “newbies,” leaving them with only about 30% of last year’s players left to play on the 2015 team.  Then, last Sunday when they traded their franchise star closing-ace Craig Kimbrel to the San Diego Padres, I was sure this signaled the fact that in their attempt to “rebuild” the team from the ground up in anticipation of contending again in perhaps 1-2 years, their front office had given up on them for this year (and maybe it did, for this year).

But despite the pessimism of the “experts” and nay-sayers, as of this writing, this improbable band of “misfits” has gone 4-0 in the first week of play (that’s 4 wins, 0 losses for you non-sports-types) – a very surprising statistic given the two good teams that they’ve played so far!   No one (including myself, a lifelong Braves fan) expected them to be doing so well given their “remake” since last year. 

Well, on Good Friday 2000 years ago, the world of religious and political “experts” were convinced that Jesus’ death was the end of the magical story of this carpenter-turned-rabbi.  Not only was he dead and buried, but all that was left of his “movement” was a mixture of “has beens” and “newbies” who (at least at first) weren’t at all sure of their abilities.  But after Jesus’ resurrection, those first Disciples -- like this year’s “new” Braves team so far – confounded the pessimistic expectations and assumptions of  the “experts” and nay-sayers, and literally turned the world upside down with the message that Jesus was, indeed, alive!

Yes, it remains to be seen if the Braves can continue their unbelievable momentum the rest of the year (baseball season, after all, lasts a loooong time!) But one thing is sure:  they have already proven that they’re “not quite dead,” so don’t count them out yet!  In the same manner, the news on that first Easter that Jesus was “not quite dead” propelled the band of misfits we call the “Disciples” to share that good news with the world, and the world has never been the same since!  Just as with the Braves, we dare not count out the power of the gospel to transform our world for Jesus Christ. 

You and I are the “misfit” messengers of that gospel today.  So, what are you doing to share the “improbable” good news of Jesus with those around you?  Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Dateline Jerusalem

“Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen!” (Luke 24:5)

Dateline Jerusalem… The religious leaders of downtown Jerusalem executed one said to be the Messiah this past weekend. Jesus of Nazareth, a traveling country preacher, died on Friday at the hands of Roman authorities after having been arrested by leading members of the Sanhedrin. The Most High Priest and other officials feared a hostile takeover by this person.

Jesus bar Joseph had been welcomed into the city last Sunday by what appeared to be a spontaneous parade, hastily thrown together. However, public approval quickly faded when he caused a scene at the temple, throwing around some of the furniture. Other controversial events followed in succeeding days, such as public arguments, teaching of strange doctrines, possible hints of tax evasion, possible assault of a privately owned fig tree, wild assertions, even talk of being a direct descendent from the Holy Deity, possibly in the fashion of certain Greek philosophies.

On Thursday evening he and a group of supporters met in a family home, where it was reported he spoke of cannibalism -- the eating of flesh and drinking of blood. Then this band of possible revolutionaries assembled in an olive garden, armed themselves, and attacked a guard, forcibly removing his ear. Authorities report the matter was dealt with quickly and justly, or on Friday he was executed along with others. Sources say the matter has been laid to rest.

Stay abreast of the situation with possible special editions of the Jerusalem Times, since there have been numerous claims of appearances of the deceased radical since this past weekend.

[–Shared by Tom Pilgrim in the Fayetteville (GA) First United Methodist Church Newsletter, March 6, 2005]

May the risen Christ fill you with the joy and awe and wonderful mystery of that first Easter! Remember, God loves you and I do, too!

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Palm Sunday

“They took palm branches and went out to meet him.  They shouted, ‘Hosanna!  Blessings on the one who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessings on the king of Israel!’” (John 12:13, CEB)

“Riding on a donkey of humility,
Jesus entered into Jerusalem -
A king without a battalion of guards
without horses, without military tanks,
without canons and machine guns.

The children laid down the branches
Of palm trees as carpet on the ground
Others lifted them up to hail him
While chorusing hosannas as he drove by,
‘Blessed is he who comes
in the name of the Lord.’

Today Jesus enters into
The gates of homes, churches and
Other machineries of control and
Down deep into every human heart.

Today let hosannas resound
Saying no to wars and weapons
No to hatred, revenge and death
But yes to the subtle claim
In the heart to let the love of Jesus reign.”

            [--Elizabeth Padillo Olesen, cited from voicesnet.com at 

When Jesus entered Jerusalem on that first Palm Sunday, he was challenging the people to choose whether or not they would claim him as a King of military might (symbolized by a white horse that he should have ridden) but as a King of peace (symbolized by the lowly donkey that he did ride).


Today, Jesus challenges us with the same choice:  welcome him as the Lord of warfare and “might makes right”? or as the “Prince of Peace”? In today’s world of violence, hatred, prejudice, terrorism, and war, Palm Sunday dares us to welcome the one who challenges us to claim him as the “Prince of Peace.”  Remember, God loves you and I do, too!